The Long Way Home — Back to Black Rock City (Part 1: Winter 2021)

We’ll get right to it — Black Rock City will be coming back in 2022. After a two-year hiatus and with persistent, pandemic-driven unknowns, the road may be a little more circuitous, but we’ll be damned if it’s not leading us Home. It’s time to resume our Waking Dreams and look to the future we’ll build together.

The Road Back to Black Rock City

Returning to Black Rock City in 2022 will involve each and every one of us. At Burning Man Project, we have been busy over the last two years investing in our people, reexamining our systems, and developing our infrastructure to ensure we’d be ready to rebuild. We took the spring and summer to do much-needed work on our properties in and around Gerlach so they can be more useful to our community and provide new spaces for creativity. 

Enormous gratitude to the 20,000+ people who donated to Burning Man Project over the last year and a half to keep us afloat. To all of you who have held the torch of Burning Man culture when we haven’t been able to physically be together in Black Rock City, THANK YOU.

The entire citizenry that makes BRC emerge from the dust and brings the city to life is more important than ever. We have immense appreciation for everything you’ve done to keep this extraordinary experiment alive. We still need your support to get over the finish line and advance our work in the world.

Thanks to generous donors who in April 2021 funded the 2020 BRC Honoraria art grant program, Burning Man Project was able to give $1 million in art grants to 62 artists. The grants provided much-needed inspiration and support to artists around the world (including in Russia, Ukraine, Spain, Canada, Austria, Mexico, and 14 U.S. states) during a time when events and projects were being delayed or canceled. 

This fall, we received 432 letters of intent for the 2022 Honoraria program, from artists in 26 countries. When we choose the projects for 2022, they will join the funded 2020/21 Honoraria projects in BRC. The 2022 Temple will be created by the Empyrean Temple Crew as an evolved version of the design they intended for BRC 2020. Our art grant program will also be looking beyond the traditional groups who apply for funding, in an effort to bring more diverse creators to BRC. 

We could not be more excited to get back into planning mode. We won’t mince words here — the lift to go back to the desert in 2022 will be significant. But when the going gets tough, the Burning Man community gets going. If the last 20 months have taught us anything, it’s that Burners are resilient. We can do this! 

Burn Week 2021: What We Learned

A big thank you to those of you who responded to our survey in September asking how you’ve been keeping the spirit of Burning Man alive and how you celebrated Burn Week 2021. 

Some of you donned a VR headset and went exploring with your avatars in the Virtual Burn, while others celebrated in-person in your local communities, with camping trips, small-scale burns, fire ritual, and working on creative projects for the next iteration of BRC.

Thousands of you (over half of the survey respondents) made the pilgrimage to the Black Rock Desert. Anecdotally, we heard from many people who were there during Burn Week that the experience felt broadly inclusive, and that most participants demonstrated a commitment to Leaving No Trace on the playa and minimizing environmental impact. The gathering showed the self-organizing chops, shared values, grit, and vigor of the Burning Man community. For those of us planning for Black Rock City 2022, it gave us pause to ask how we can not over-engineer the container that is Black Rock City and keep it as wild and edgy as possible.

Almost a quarter of the survey respondents who ventured to the playa during Burn Week felt it was a freeing experience (22%). The intimate nature and human scale of the gathering was a major draw, and more than 50% of our survey respondents reported that it met or exceeded your expectations. Sixty-eight percent told us that city infrastructure, art, and/or a central burn are crucial for bigger events. 

We learned that for most of you, Burning Man culture is alive and evolving, and many are determined to gather and celebrate Burning Man culture no matter the circumstances. The 10 Principles were alive and well over Burn Week this year — almost everyone (95% of survey respondents) reported practicing them. Your responses also confirmed that Burners care deeply about the safety of our community.

BIG CHANGES IN BLACK ROCK CITY 2022

As our city has evolved over the years, and as Burning Man culture has gained more attention, the need to protect decommodified spaces has grown even more pressing. The critical question of how to address convenience camps (also known as “turnkey” or “plug and play” camps) and the work of Cultural Direction Setting has highlighted “convenience culture” as a central community issue. 

RVs in Black Rock City, 2016 (Photo by Philippe Glade)

Outside Services Program Changes

The Outside Services (OSS) program for BRC was designed to support projects and camps by facilitating access to the city by large-scale service providers. Their services have included provision of heavy equipment, fuel, water, sanitation, generators, and delivered housing in the form of RVs and trailers. After taking a close look at usage data of the OSS program and findings from our Cultural Direction Setting community engagement project, it was clear that we needed to re-align the OSS program to its intended purpose and Burning Man’s Principles. 

The last few iterations of BRC saw significant growth in delivered housing, which was often used as a backbone for convenience camps.

In an effort to course-correct, we are no longer allowing delivered housing units to be part of the OSS program.

That means no more pathways for pre-paid RV or trailer deliveries to participants within BRC. We’re also re-evaluating which equipment and services are appropriate for the program. Stay tuned for more details around how this shift away from delivered housing directly supports our sustainability goals, and opens up opportunities for experimenting with solar and other green technologies through the program.

Monkey Chant at Center Camp, 2019 (Photo by Bill Klemens)

Reimagining Center Camp

In the experiment that is Black Rock City, the Center Camp Café has been a beloved space where Burners from all walks of life meet friends old and new, stop and sit awhile, perform, interact with art, and grab a cuppa joe (or tea or lemonade!) at the coffee shop. Over the years, camps have developed infrastructure to become increasingly self-reliant, and it’s no longer unique to serve espresso. Coffee sales have dramatically decreased, use of the Center Camp coffee shop has declined, and the operation has become hard to justify from the standpoints of cost and environmental footprint. And, while it isn’t exactly in violation of the principle of Decommodification, it has always felt somewhat odd to be running a coffee concession in the center of our city.

The coffee shop operation uses nearly 10,000 gallons of diesel fuel to transport, power, refrigerate, and keep ice frozen. It generates around 25,000 gallons of graywater that require plumbing and trenching of the playa, and it produces waste — around 30,000 compostable cups and thousands of hard-to-recycle Tetra Pak containers of milk, for example. These impacts are significant and do not jibe with our commitment laid out in the 2030 Environmental Sustainability Roadmap.

In 2022, we’re trying something new: there will be no sales of coffee (or anything else!) at the Center Camp Café.

Center Camp will remain a vibrant hub of engagement and participation with performance and art. There will still be an acre of beautifully designed, shaded and welcoming space for members of the community to enjoy and activate. We’re excited for these upcoming changes, and hope you are too. You’ll hear about it here with information on what you can do to engage the space for 2022. 

Note: This will not impact ice sales at Arctica.

Cultural Direction Setting and Placement Process Changes 

In 2022 there will be important changes to Black Rock City’s placement process that are highlighted in this recent post from the Placement team. Updated Camp Placement Criteria, including a new criterion for “uniqueness,” will be applied in evaluating camps for placement. In addition, you can expect an earlier Placement timeline, a more comprehensive camp standing process, new strategies for camps that struggle to meet community standards, and transparent communications from the Placement team. Check out the post for more details about changes including a call for interest from current placed camps in good standing, and new deadlines for input and response from us designed to help you prioritize resource-sharing between camps. 

The Box Office, 2015 (Photo by SN Jacobson)

BRC 2022 Ticketing Info 

For many, the journey to Black Rock City starts with securing a ticket. This year we will be making adjustments to how tickets are distributed in order to better support community values around inclusivity, as outlined in the R.I.D.E. pledge; we’ll be supporting underrepresented forms of creative expression, including performance art; and we will be taking sustainability efforts into consideration. We’re planning to launch the FOMO sale in January. More information about registration and sale dates will be shared in the new year. You can expect subsequent sales roughly around their usual timeframes. Subscribe to the Jackrabbit Speaks to stay up to date.

Coming Soon!

Please stay tuned for Part 2 of the winter 2021 post in our “The Long Way Home” series. We’ll share important health and safety information, and updates about environmental sustainability and Radical Inclusion in BRC. As always, subscribe to the Burning Man Journal to stay in the know about all things BRC-planning related and more. 


Cover image of the road to the Man in Black Rock City, 2019 (Photo by Vanessa Franking)

About the author: Burning Man Project

Burning Man Project

The official voice of the Burning Man organization, managed by Burning Man Project's Communications Team.

158 Comments on “The Long Way Home — Back to Black Rock City (Part 1: Winter 2021)

  • Burning Man Project Communications says:

    Reminder: Burning Man Project has a responsibility to maintain this space for the benefit of all participants, to ensure that comments serve to enhance the experience of our visitors, rather than cause harm. While spirited conversation is welcome, unruly and rude behavior is not. Posts that are harmful to others or run counter to the spirit of civil discourse may be removed.

    Please review our COMMENT POLICY here, then comment with care: https://journal.burningman.org/comment-policy/

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    • tony says:

      STOP IT!!! keep the coffee, you are overthinking it again

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      • Chilli says:

        I love centre camp coffee, but it has always made me uncomfortable that I have to deal with money at the burn. It also always makes me feel weird when I explain to default world-ers that “the only things you can buy are ice …and coffee”, when I’m trying to get them to understand Decommodification. We have to practise what we preach.

        This along with the stark realisation from this article that wow, centre camp coffee is not very eco-conscious or sustainable.

        Buying coffee at centre camp is convenient. We are always trying to address/cancel convenience culture on playa. If you want coffee, then you can participate, interact, and integrate with the many many camps that serve coffee or other refreshing drinks. Or you can self reliantly bring your own.

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      • The Burns says:

        Um no. Bring your own coffee my friend. And if you think there should be coffee available to others, bring lots of coffee! and share it! This is Burningman dude!

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      • Yes the coffee is tradition and tips get people home ,
        You are over thinking this a bit
        Ice is sacred Coffee ( altho possibly the worst fucking coffee I’ve ever EVER had) is Tradition.
        I’ve said for years l,: ike 20 of my 27 years of continued burning . , That the Principle of Decomodification is sacred and is sadly decayed which leads to a level of dilution that provides a different consciousness and participant. WE should have …AND PLEASE JOIN ME IN THESE LAST TWO RANDOM CONSIDERATIONS FROM A SEASONED VET OF DUST AND MUST…
        a division of regulatory managing of eye pollution.
        A DEPARTMENT or “Deep Art Meant” of DeComodification . Like DMV or DPW or as a branch , that checks all vehicles coming into event for brands unmodified or uncovered. ( YES!!! YES THANK YOU ALCHEMY GOD YES!! AND OF COURSE WE SHALL PROVIDE YOU WITH A IMPORTANT ROLE AND REMEMBER THIS IN OUR FUTURE HISTORIC ARCHIVES AS YOUR BIG FAT FUCKING IDEA AND A TEAM SHALL BE RAISED WITH YOU THRU THE OFFICES AND A BETTER BURN EXPERIANCE IS ASSENDED , PATCHES, COOL PLAY STICKERS ,LINGO,,SPECIAL LOGOS , MAYBE A MEDAL? A SEAT NEXT TO ANYBODY IN FIRST CAMP, ). Yes a Department that provides management and even rewards …block the vehicles to another D lot provide supplies to cover brands , pre entry… Don’t want to wait ? well prepare and cover your corporate crap . ( Unless it’s satire somehow artistically identifiable
        A quick visual check at gate and then spontaneous acts of community quality controls , supported by PR .
        Teams of brand control agents with grade reports can be as secret shoppers do, travel camps and villages and submit report cards for participant inclusive actions of decomod excellence ,or lesser more remedial grades . With referrals for raising a better camp vision .
        Awards for better placement ,cool swag ,archival respects and perhaps a bank of free tickets ,one for every participant individual at a camp or maybe just no wait entrance and free or half priced ticket free parking pass , unlimited ice . A hot springs private booking . (Keep that award like at 5 a year during event with time limits ) some kinda flaunty show off OOOOoooo I wanna get THAT. Incentive .

        And as for inclusion…..
        There needs to be more miracles needs to be a cap on paid ticket attendence for returning aging vets in provable historic track rate of burn return. Ie. You go to burn Burn like a match in a pool of glitterated gas , yearly hell or high ,. Water
        After 20 burns consecutive or hard burn concurrent , you get a free ticket .
        This insured the plentitude of veteran value of elders influence involvement to virgin YES FUCKING VIRGIN NOT NEWBIES OMG!! ratios and will revive our former glory with spf and gin fueled Viva spectrum culture. Offer miracles to empoverished but self sufficient Dlot regulars ( cough ..cough..) by descetion or by some low bar but a flammable low bar
        .. and also do community out reach at art schools , thru city programs ( civic and desert)
        Then offer inclusion freely as a gift or with some engaging task , keep it interesting , go to black community news and BLM community and other underserved youth ,elder, and souls in poverty or whatever..homeless camps ESPECIALLY and create AMBASSADORS. ( DAMN DYSLEXIA !! forgive me.).
        Every million air camp must support tickets by numbers , to random person’s awards are designated thru a video of why they should go , made by them or about them .
        Don’t discourage the Millionaires , incourage their duty to the default engagement and inclusion. And force them to provide an art tax of supporting the assistance in creating a art piece designed vision of some under privileged artist , or pay for the making of a wonder piece ..could be a camp or vehicle , that will after event , be publically installed ,made by pros over seen by the little artist , Cinderella story .
        The brand maybe infered but not made visible at Playa , the sponcership can be visible off Playa after event ,on line after ..
        Probably should include some form of mobile housing … Cause I’m that’s what’s goin down in Oakland ..
        Join the YoudiverseCity Lab a Colabitat for Radical portable A FORT ABLE tiny house art v culture and innovative housing as an EXPERIANCE EXPO!

        IN Oakland ..live free make shit , pursue happiness while making your footprint a dubstep to the future for housing for everyone . Yes free.. as in rentless. You pay for rent at the Playa ?
        Email youdiversecity@gmail.com
        My name is Alchemy God’s dirtylilsecret and I support this cult endorsement …

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      • Franklin 3D says:

        The arguments for getting rid of the coffee shop is illogical. – The claim is that it coffee sales have decreased dramatically, yet the coffee shop generates 30,000 paper cups to be disposed of. If there was greater use of the coffee shop, there would even be more paper cups – A little less use would be a good thing. There is also no consideration of the fact that the coffee shop draws people to center camp.

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      • Ana Harboe says:

        BM is a place of bliss. Saddens me to see dispute here

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      • Dr. FlimFlam says:

        Bring your own coffee. You bring your own food and water, Coffee Is no different

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    • scott says:

      I hope the wa wa book has a section on camps that offer coffee!

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    • Karla says:

      Hey I hate that I always have to add at the end of my down right beautiful description of the BM experience and mission statement is…. Oh but you can buy coffee, ice absolutely, Starbucks, damn

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    • Karla says:

      Also the privilege of making coffee at Burningman at 6am, PRIVILEGE

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    • Dr. FlimFlam says:

      Now if we can stop selling ice, water service and sewer service for campers, BM would be nearly there to following it’s principles.

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    • Segue Fischlin says:

      Wow, there’s quite the debate on coffee!!! How about THIS? BMOrg sets up the coffee counters and electricity and maybe a small freezer so that PARTICIPANTS can opt to serve coffee at the Center Café. So the only thing BmOrg does is provide the infrastructure. it is up to the participants to offer coffee whenever they want to others if they want to play a role in that service to the center of the City. A great networking opportunity and no commercial vending involved. Build enough counter space for more than one group to serve at a time. No need for a schedule then; people simply show up when they show up. Or have a schedule (though we all know that a volunteer schedule is more like a suggestion anyways, especially when we’re on playa time)

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  • Roberto Dobbisano says:

    wait a second. wait a second. hold on…

    Where the fuck am i going to redeem all these Larry Bucks for coffee?

    i was told they were good forever.

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    • Randomcitizenxesq says:

      Well when you pass Dlot ..bring them to me and I’ll value them at my Burning bean coffee hut ,
      Larry and me we had same birthday… We are like virtually the same person but I’m a little unhoused punk rocker with broken teeth ( like Larry!! had) who runs Oaklands largest most radical Burner flavored free rent acreage of 29 acres for theme campus arts and squaller . Burn the Van!! Free coffee

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  • lucky420 says:

    Glad to see no more trailer deliveries and wow, TIL how much waste center camp coffee generated. Glad it’s going away too

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    • roissy says:

      Yes, but now it is going to be split among 50 camps (or more) I am aware of the hoops the org jumped through in trying to recycle, can we say the same about the other camps???

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      • Java says:

        There are already a ton of breakfast camps that do coffee. This will be fine. And coffee isn’t even close to the most waste producing thing out there.

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      • sgmcb says:

        It’s a great point, roissy. Deciding how far that argument should extend is the principle challenge of balancing self-reliance with sustainability.

        For example: Should there be dumpsters at exodus, since the BOrg can presumably manage the removal of the whole city’s waste more effectively than many individual camps?

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    • Recycle Michael says:

      It’s wild how much waste coffee makes. Everything about coffee kinda sucks. I am excited to see what center camp looks like without it.

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    • Motorboat says:

      I agree completely! I am so happy to see these (2) very significant changes! Yes.

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  • Joe Barbera says:

    Heartening to address the hypocrisy of the turn key camps finally. Kind of like moving back to a BRC for everyone, not one for us and one for them.

    Gonna miss the coffee, but it never did seem to make sense.

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  • yay says:

    These are great moves in the right direction. Thank you.

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    • Tango says:

      I kept exclaiming F**k Yeah! as I read through the article. LOVE that the delivered housing is gone. Hallelujah to this one, folks! Coffee will not be a scarce resource on the playa…just bring your own cup!

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  • David says:

    Sounds good. Keep up the good work!

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  • Tipi Dan says:

    These are appropriate top-down adjustments. Other adjustments that start at the bottom may also be necessary, like a new ethos to “stop shopping” for Burning Man— and to start scrounging. Veterans know that has always been the way to go. Newbies may be a little confused by consumerism’s stranglehold on the default world.

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    • Philip Price says:

      Yes! Interesting tho….we love finding treasures for our camp at Habitat ReStores and thrift stores. Everything from Ibeams and wood for our structures to clothing and ice chests. Now, rich folks are crowding us out, as it’s so trendy to shop in the poor people’s cathedrals ;). Still, it’s super fun to find shop the back alleys for BM goods ;). Buying anything retail is a failure! Reduce, Reuse, Recycle!!!! Actually, this should be the 12th Principle, after “consent.” Big Bird, Elephant Camp

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  • Larry Edelstein says:

    Boooo i volunteered as a cashier many years running and loved it. So many people to talk to, soooo many accents, interesting encounters

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    • Chilli says:

      You can meet people with different accents and from different cultures and backgrounds if you work shifts at a camp, serving snow cones, or alcohol, or coffee of your own creation, or face painting, or anything else. It’s still there, the people won’t go away, just the coffee counter.

      Also – handling cash at burning man just doesn’t feel right to me. I did it working shifts at Arctica and I just don’t like this whole sense of making sure people have the right amount of money, tipping and the judgement it brings, awareness of counterfeit money (yes, in one instance it happened), all of the things that I want to leave behind in default world. Money creates barriers, money is dirty, and we need to practise as much as possible leaving it behind for the short time that we are living in BRC.

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      • Chilli says:

        Also, before making comments on purchasing ice at Arctica, ice is necessary, it aids survival (I melt ice to drink the water instead of bringing in water with me). Sure, I just won’t be one of the people handling cash at Arctica any more, I prefer to be a greeter or to haul the ice in instead. But if you liked to work at the counter and you can’t find a camp that gives you that, you can still always work at Arctica. Just be aware that much like centre camp, it’s a fast paced environment so cash handling doesn’t give you the time to really talk to people because there’s often someone else waiting on line. Working shifts at a camp removes this obstacle, it’s way more pleasant and interactive and engaging.

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    • Trancer says:

      Yeah, I volunteered as a runner supporting the Baristas. It was so much fun! I hate to see it go. But the environmental impact thing does make sense.

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      • Wonka says:

        As an 8 yr Barista and trainer at CCC I can honestly say I agree whole heartedly with this change up. Sometimes things need to change in order to move forward while preserving the integrity of BM core principles . I absolutely loved the experience of making coffee at the worlds busiest coffee shop every week for a year. It’s always been the highlight of my Burn working alongside other volunteers who are as passionate about coffee, burning mans and service to others as I Am. It was never easy work either; fighting the elements, maintaining dept of health food/beverage standards and keeping the wide-eyed- bushy-tailed marauders from going apeshit whilst waiting in line to get their morning dose while coming off their evening high, so many time so little challenges … scratch that, reverse it. Sad to lose this part of my yearly experience, grateful for the opportunity and optimistic about the future. Thank you CCC Core crew for allowing me to participate and share in the adventure. And as always DEATH BEFORE DECAF!!! – – – Wuv, W O N K A – – –

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  • Joey says:

    This applies to first camp I’m sure.

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    • Visionary says:

      I think you mean First Turnkey Plug and Play Camp? I don’t think the BMORG elites will give-up their ticket proceeds paid for celebrity chiefs and Airstream trailers any time soon!

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      • Tango says:

        Hey, don’t knock the airstreamers!! Haha! My camp is Airstreameri :) We take great pride in exposing our aluminum dildos to the very fine and alkaline dust!

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  • KB says:

    Nice moves on deterring plug and play. Much needed. Was a nice relief this year not having that, and seeing more participation. Please make announcements and decisions on vax requirements before selling tickets. Also, if you are going to have these requirements, it only makes sense to allow tests (or proof of recent recovery) instead of vax cards. I think we all can see by now that a test is more telling than if someone is vaxed or not.

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  • Eric says:

    No more trailer delivery through OSS: I gather the intent is to stop RV or camper trailers being delivered to turnkey camps.

    What about camps that used OSS to truck in a semi trailer filled with camp infrastructure?

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  • Shenanigans says:

    I shall miss meeting people in the cafe lineups, but now I’ll meet them at the theme camps that step up to fill the void. Well done❤️

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  • danibel says:

    I AM SO GLAD for the OSS change! Please watch for profiteers trying to skirt the system. Also – clear guidelines and no nepotism on housing “camps.” PLEASE!

    While I enjoyed my cup of joe (a mocha on Saturday/Early Sunday morning while traipsing around waiting for sunrise was a tradition!), I understand and support this change towards a more sustainable burn.

    Placement – please note – 24 hour coffee camp in the general center camp area would be fabulous, darling. maybe a “unique” idea for a budding theme camp…

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  • Matthew The Mailman says:

    Loving these changes. Keep up the great work! Excited to see how the new changes rollout for placement.

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  • NakedYoga says:

    I can’t wait to come home. So happy to hear this announcement. Mil gracias. NakedYoga

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  • Witchy says:

    I was a Volunteer in the Center Camp Cafe Coffee Shop from 2001 to 2017. I saw a lot of change, some for good & others, not so much.

    It’s absolutely true that the coffee shop was really a source of waste/trash and selling coffee definitely didn’t make enough $$ to support the Cafe entirely or be profitable. A view of the Coffee Shop through the viewpoint of an MBA cannot show its value.

    It’s sad that the coffee shop and the easy entree into volunteerism for participants & acculturation for volunteers won’t be available anymore. It used to be said that the Coffee Shop was “The Gateway to Volunteerism.” I’m fairly sure that every other team at Burning Man is peppered with people who first volunteered with the Coffee Shop. They have artist alumni, too—volunteers who have gone on to create art.

    But this is exactly what I feared would happen, should the focus change to the business & sales of coffee.

    The coffee shop was never about business/sales when I was involved. Selling coffee was more of a byproduct of what we did, a necessary part of running a community space, where people would be comfortable joining, as they did in the default world. I had many midnight chats with Larry about that… about acculturation, commodification, community, the value of a community space with “real world” entry points, volunteerism, the role of coffee shops in the history of the arts…

    He used to come visit on the night that the flags were raised & we’d sit there, in the empty cafe,, drinking whiskey (I always made sure I had a flask at the ready), smoking cigarettes, talking, and getting a little bit drunk.

    “I’m not in the business of selling coffee, I’m in the business of building community.”
    —perhaps my greatest quote-worthy statement ever

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    • Retro says:

      HI Witchy.
      Funny, we always said Lamplighters/Greeters was the volunteerism gateway drug. Those remain as easy entrees into volunteerism for participants & acculturation, along with the nearby walk-up V-Spot in the Center Camp Portal (Keyhole, if you like).
      Take care,
      ~ Retro

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    • John Rundall says:

      Witchy – well said. I suppose it will work out, but I think the loss of community is sad. They could probably reduce the footprint even more if they stopped selling ice. Also, reducing the number of attendees by 1/2 would also save resources. Make BM a small gathering of four people and a reusable thermos would do the trick – that would be a very small impact!

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    • Taco teddy says:

      Center camp was my 2nd volunteer opportunity after throwing myself into temple crew in 16… but I loved it – and lived on espresso at all my burns with more than enough cash left over from the real hideous expenses of ticket and costume… the idea that the logistics of running four espresso machines is a sore point of carbon footprint is compellingly laughable – but a very clever way to kill center camp traffic… my camp will be gifted a new espresso machine which we will run off our solar array and I will hump twenty gallons of radiance dairy organic milk from Fairfield iowa and the grinders and bags of fair trade organic coffee beans and cease those magic double shifts of pulling shots at the center of the universe – but one of my greatest and most sustained rituals at the burn is lost for me now….

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  • Gaia "Drag0nfly" says:

    Yay, no more “trailer cities” !! I cant imagine doing Burning Man in a turnkey camp. Half the fun is planning for months to just get there. It’s part of the experience. And I’m sure center camp will evolve into something wonderful.
    “Burn On”

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  • I say this with a lot of love to an organization and a group of burners who have shown me a lot of love. I went to the burn once. What I loved about it was that it wasn’t a “safe” place; no one was trying to protect me from my own decisions. What I didn’t love about it was the money. I’ll just let that statement stand on its own.

    It’s sad to see the org focusing again on where the dollars are going to demonstrate its “accomplishments.” It’s even sadder to see it once again making all the decisions that add up to “playing it safe.”

    Please read through this post again, and see if it sounds like it’s written by a group that’s determined to keep pushing the boundaries of human creativity and audacity. Or does it maybe sound more like a committee-edited, corporate PR release?

    With , Iཞöŋɖąɖ

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    • Trancer says:

      My first experience of Black Rock City, it was considered a TAZ ( temporary autonomous zone). A lot of signs posted how many minutes since last injury. The event was quite a bit wilder then, but everything grows and evolves over time. I’d go back if I had a time machine! Who wouldn’t!

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      • Trancer, I ♡ these stories of early burns. I suspect I would have felt much more at home in BRC then than I do now, but at the time I was making different life decisions. I should add that there’s a lot I love about the Burning Man beyond the larger license to be whoever/whatever I am than I feel like I have outside the trash fence. When the org focuses on money over maintaining the spirit that made these early burns so exceptional, tho, the event looks more and more like another festival among many others. It’s just the path that the org seems to have chosen- and there’s nothing inherently wrong with that. Maybe it would help set expectations the org can deliver on consistently if it just embraced that decision as part of its identity. Pretty much everyone outside the core community calls it a festival anyways. I think it’s telling that they don’t see what’s so different about Burning Man in its current incarnation from something like Coachella. Thanks for sharing the memory and much ♡, Iཞöŋɖąɖ

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  • Papa Penguin says:

    Change is often good, and these changes sound very good.

    As always, thank you for keeping us informed!

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  • Nathan says:

    THANK YOU SO VERY MUCH BURNING PROJECT :D

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  • Lion Moon says:

    Ticket adjustments… please not another lottery?!

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  • Rebecca Hernreich says:

    As a single women in her 60’s coming home for the 8th time I was disappointed to hear there will not be RV delivery service. I come alone I don’t own an RV and I don’t know how to drive one. I have used the same folks for the past 4 Burns and have been very happy. I can be self sustaining once I have my home on the Playa. With this news I don’t know what I’ll do!

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    • Kegels says:

      Rent an RV, find someone who will drive with you, and drive the RV. They get to transport their stuff in your Rv too. This is a form of Rideshare. You’ll make friends.
      Post to Spark and Craigslist.

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    • Sunni dae says:

      I totally agree, I don’t have the means to get a trailer out there and have had one delivered each year. I am older single woman as well and this keeps me independent. I don’t go to plug and play camps. It is not as easy as it sounds to find someone to drive it in, and I tried that route before finding a service that provided it and is a non profit. I wish I could just buy a tent and wrangle it, I did it for 2 years before my back snapped. I wish my body was it’s former self you have no idea how much , I have been an active participant of the burn since 2014 I am a late bloomer burner and it gives me hope look forward to going.. I do think pnp camps over indulge but there are those of us who do not abuse the services that are being hurt by this.

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  • Ruth A Talisman says:

    All good news. I haven’t bought coffee at Center camp for years. (But our camp goes there almost every day.) Nobody will miss the fortresses of identical RVs. Both moves in the right direction.

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  • Shiny says:

    Lol.. I think someone addeded a couple zeros to your maths.. If you wasted 10k gallons of deisel to run coffee makers year after year you should all be fired. Please post the maths involved in this equation.. The entire 747 camp with 25 plug and plays and 50 drive INS on generators 24-7 didn’t use that much fuel.. we’ll wait….

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    • YourMileageMayVary says:

      I think it’s far more than just the fuel to run the gennies for espresso machines – there’s the 2 refrigerated semi-trailers (one is delivered w/ ice used in drinks, one is delivered from supplier w/milk etc) and both require lots of refueling – to stay cold in the middle of the desert- during the 10 days they’re onsite. Add in the transport fuel for other suppliers: coffee beans, espresso machines, all that potable water brought in plus gray water taken out, and more supplies I’m sure… seems believable that it IS taking thousands of gallons of fuel to run the beverage sales operations of the Center Camp Cafe.

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  • Aurielle Tineo says:

    Change is the only thing that is permanent, and to not evolve is to not grow and develop. Thus we must embrace difficult times not so much as struggles but as opportunities for growth and enlightenment. Let us celebrate a glorious recommencement regardless of our present challenges.

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  • Zinger says:

    Good news. Never liked that Center Camp sold coffee when many camps have dedicated themselves to gifting it. Also glad about the banning of delivery of RVs for folks, let’s get back to Radical Self Reliance.

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  • Rita Volkland says:

    I’m loving the changes! <3

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  • Visionary says:

    I am glad to see you are trying to crack down on the dreaded “turnkey” or “plug and play” camps although I have a feeling your efforts to contain the rich and powerful from permanently wrecking Black Rock City may not succeed in the long run. They have a tendency and the means to destroy everything that was useful.

    Can you address how you will improve the gate operation so that instead of us having to wait for hours and hours and hours in a giant parking lot we will be able to keep moving and GET IN?

    I PROMISE 2022 WILL BE THE BEST BURNING MAN EVER!

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    • henry watts says:

      Agree about the wait to get in. It was massively obvious, even at 3:30am, that there were about 15% of the greeting stations needed. It’s great that the greeters are there and the screening they do is useful. But they are making *thousands* of people wait, after long drives in many cases, for hours and hours and hours to get in and find a campsite.

      If enough greeters can’t be found to do the function in the delightful way they’d like to, then the greeting process needs to be scaled back. The wait in line, for hours, is really not the best way to start the experience.

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      • Burner says:

        You drive past the empty greeter hut without stopping but you might not get the guide schedule book and map. The bottleneck is at gate , workers stopping and searching cars. I had to sit there during a shift change when they refused to work.

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  • Dragon says:

    Serving coffee/espresso drinks etc. at the Center Camp Cafe was always a great time spent playing with customers and teammates. But, yes, sadly…it’s time to close it down. There are plenty of other venues to volunteer at, and one can find coffee and any other drink served there at a theme camp.

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  • Cookie says:

    great changes made to course correct! as someone who is not a part of a registered theme camp and has historically camped in open camping, I have a feeling it will become increasingly difficult for me to attain tickets unless i become a part of a camp with DGS tickets, or i pay extra for FOMO tickets. I wish there was a way to still get open sale tickets and prove i am a good citizen of BRC by exuding principles and volunteering.

    Perhaps there could be an open sale for people who volunteer X hours of shifts?? Not sure the correct way to go about this, but the ticketing process for upholding BRC citizens not a part of DGS is not set up great at the Moment

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    • Ramblin’ Red says:

      If you are indeed volunteering then your shifts *are* recorded. Over the years I’ve volunteered with Gate multiple times, Burn Perimeter and Lamplighters. Depending on the number of shifts you put in, those are recognized in various ways ranging from meal tickets to DGS tickets. You can sign up in advance, there’s a link right on the main burningman.org page. So go forth, and volunteer! You’ll have fun at the very least.

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    • Formica says:

      Hi Cookie,

      All of the organized volunteer departments that are part of the Burning Man organization offer either a guaranteed, reduced-price ticket, or a “staff credential” (a free ticket in the form of a wristband) if you work a sufficient number of shifts. This number varies from department to department, and year to year, but it is very attainable for anyone who spends more than a few days on-playa.

      The only hoop you have to jump through is that you have to get a head start, i.e. the first year that you officially volunteer and have your contributions tracked, you’ll have to get your own ticket with your own resources. After that, presuming that you work enough shifts, the next year (and all subsequent years, provided you work enough shifts) you will be guaranteed access to the event, either with a reduced-price ticket or a staff credential. In many departments (I can’t speak for all of them, here), you are also permitted to carry-over that ticket/credential for one year, if you wish to take a year off from volunteering and can secure a ticket by other means (DGS, FOMO, general sale, etc) or do not attend the event. If you use your ticket/credential and do not volunteer that year, however, you’ll have to start all over again.

      Many departments incentivize participation by offering extra shift credit for working shifts that are otherwise difficult to fill, such as graveyard and early morning shifts, shifts during large burn events, etc. This can allow you to very quickly amass the needed shift credit for a ticket/credential if you’re willing to work when others are not.

      Volunteering to get guaranteed access to the event is the “gateway drug” to volunteering for many people. It removes an extraordinary amount of uncertainty from the process of going to Burning Man, and does not require you to participate in a registered theme camp that receives DGS tickets if you do not wish to do so.

      Volunteering does require that you register with the Org and get into the system, so to speak. You can get started with that here:

      https://profiles.burningman.org/volunteer

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  • Kit says:

    This is all good news!!

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  • The Backwoodsman says:

    Thankyou for the kind words about the Renegade Burn. There was an awful lot of ugliness online when it happened, and a certain amount of patronisation after the event. Your respectful acknowledgement of the event without tsk-tsking fellow Burners–who kept the flame alive when the Borg couldn’t, or wouldn’t–is an excellent step towards the reconciliation that Burners–renegade or not–so desperately need. Thanks.

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    • Rex Hardcore says:

      True reconciliation would be the acknowledging that the company is not needed, and is actually an obstacle to creative expression, and then it terminating itself. The company is well aware of this, but money is money. So pay up, suckers! Line up for your transformative experience.

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      • Murder MILLIE says:

        Such a sad comment after such a lovely one. I suppose it comes from all sides. I too am glad to see that the Bmorg found value in the efforts of the community to create their own experience during a challenging time. It’s that kind of appreciation and acknowledgment that will bring us together, not this unfortunate comment.

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      • Really odd comments about a non-profit company.

        If you really believe that the org is not needed, there is absolutely nothing stopping people from going out during the rest of the year and having or being a part of the many un-organized events.

        But no need for you to complain about something that many people love.

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      • While the rogue burn was a fun party, it was not Burning Man. As an artist, I very much missed spending the week on my bike experiencing incredible art. If all you want to do is drink and socialize with friends with no infrastructure and no rules, stay home and throw a party. For my way of thinking, I’d like to give the BM organization a big THANK YOU for making art a top priority.

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  • Dmagz says:

    Staggering toward the goal of FULL participation it’s great to see.

    Excited to no longer be jumping into the back of caravans that cost more than I’ve earned in my life time!

    It’s going to be a new adventure at gate navigating this new world we’re stepping into. Expect longer entry times this year. That seems safe to say but I’m sure we’ll be working harder than ever to get everyone through that narrow filter as fast as possible.

    Blessed be the patient!

    We’re inching ever closer towards the event most of us want to see, very exciting.

    See ya’ll in the dust.

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  • haf def says:

    “In an effort to course-correct, we are no longer allowing delivered housing units to be part of the OSS program.”

    F##k yeah!!

    I am thiniking that there will still be “convenience camps”, but the ORG not sanctioning and inviting them is a huge step in the right direction. BYOH, Bring Your Own Housing is a good thing.

    Say, anybody out there this past Labor Day see any sort of plug and plays? I didn’t, but I am not the most socially skilled kind of guy.

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    • Caleb N says:

      Not sure what the exact criteria for a plug and play is, but there were definitely a couple camps I saw a bit outside of the “city” that looked professionally built. One had a perfect ring of a dozen or so identical massive RVs.

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    • Awesome says:

      We did but it was only 1 that had numerous RV’s that were the same and similar bikes inside and all that crap they give those that can’t make it on their own. I t was pretty closed off and had “employees” during the day making food and doing maintenance. Gotta say, it was better than having that horrendous sound camp out on the 9 o’clock that wouldn’t shut the hell up for even a second. The music and bass were horrible.

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  • Rex says:

    Burning Man this year was pretty great. We should just do that again.

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  • Dorne Pentes says:

    A good start, y’all. Convenience camps do nothing to promote the culture- they only commodify it. Please make them all go away….even if some of your major donors run them.

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  • Reese E. Forbes says:

    I always wondered if the coffee violated “leave no trace” and/or other principles. Fine with me to have it gone.
    Trailer deliveries also seem problmatice, to me, but I assumed nothing could be done – glad to see that is being remediated.
    I am glad the BM Org is examining everything.

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  • Judge says:

    So…no ice sales?

    Does this mean there will be vendors with insulated trucks in Gerlach selling ice now for $10 a bag?

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  • Do not despair. We will have your coffee at Rogue Nation Village. We will be using solar power energy to heat your morning “Liquid Hugs for your Brain” Bring your own cup. Don’t visit too early, The sun has to get going without it’s coffee.

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  • K9 of Rain says:

    Of course, very high on a list of the many reasons 2021’s unofficial Burning Man was preferred by SO many (including the BLM rangers we spoke to) is something I guess cannot be changed: the glorious absence of a trash fence (not so much the physical fence – but it’s use to restrict freedom and the prison camp vibe that that engenders). And in general terms the absence, too, of the vast amount of stifling bureaucratic and management infrastructure like … oh I dunno .. bar codes, security checks, patrols, allocated spaces, prohibited spaces, locked toilets, bouncers, pulsing, high ticket prices, coffee tickets for the privileged few, ditto shower passes, ditto meal tickets, narrow parameters about what makes an ‘acceptable art car’ (it was so wonderful to see the basic sofa on wheels again last time). Oh dear! The list is so long. At the 2021 event it really seemed evident that so much of the official events’ rules and regs are perhaps (I said perhaps) not so necessary. And BTW one does appreciate that some of this may be imposed on the event by the BLM. In short (well, it was meant to be short), having attended the wonderful 2021 event, this 20+ year Burning Man veteran (and committed volunteer) may be coming to the end of the love affair with the -organized- version [tear in eye icon].

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  • Manny Barthe says:

    A new criterion for “uniqueness”. You have obviously lost your minds. And enough of your moralizing and constant messaging about how to behave and be more like what and who you deem acceptable. You have become nothing but a sad reflection of the worst in society. A smug spoiled group of wannabe rebels, reveling in your propaganda seeking control for all of the worst reasons. I’ll leave you to yourselves.

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  • Joe says:

    Hang on – isnt OSS how litterally every camp gets their containers and infrastructure delivered too the playa –

    How are you going to drive in the tool store for a 50m art installation ?

    Seems like a strange way to limit turn key camps – they will just hire to drive their gear in – burning man goes full trucker

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  • Frank Raniolo says:

    In my first years at BRC (2012/2013) I was the subject of some amazing guerilla street theatre performances. I am lucky, it was incredible.

    As part of your performance art support, please give substantial support to Guerrilla Street Theatre, this is important for the culture of BRC.

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  • Alex "Seagull" Segal says:

    The presence of the turnkey camps weighed heavily in my decision in 2014 to no longer make my trek to Black Rock City. I’m glad to hear the org is ending it

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  • Biff says:

    Great move on both the plug n plays and the coffee, it never made any sense to me, how is buying coffee/tea/lemonade radically self reliant? I’ve been going since before the coffee sales, we just brewed our own in camp and everyone was happy. And this was when most people were in tents, long before rv’s got so popular out there.

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  • The Hustler says:

    It looks like some people need to re-read the post and probably actually go to Burning Man; possibly look up the actual definition of freedom and what a prison camp is. The whining about nonsense is pretty sad.

    To read the comments you can be forgiven for thinking people were talking about prison experiences. Black Rock City is a difficult but magical place.

    I’m pretty happy for the changes. It was nice to get a chai in Center Camp late at night, but I’ll survive without it. I always wondered where the coffee grounds went, how much water it took and what powered it all (I mean, there are huge generators powering the grid).

    I’m stoked to finally go back, assuming I can actually go.

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  • To Mars! says:

    While I highly welcome removing professional housing through OSS I want to raise the concern of inclusivity.
    Some folks might rely on some help with housing eg due age, driving capability or travel arrangements.
    If eg 5% of housing or vehicles for a camp would be allowed to be delivered then turn-keys would be still not possible and camps can have some flexibility for those who need it. Thanks for consideration.

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  • Yer Mahm says:

    For those of you lamenting any of the conveniences no longer offered… no one is stopping you from providing them. Feel free.

    Renegade will be watching, beyond the trash fence.

    If you end up in D Lot.. swing by.

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  • Hallelujah! No more center camp hypocrisy over decommodification!

    I get that they sell ice to help manage campers with less gear who need refridgeration, but if you can’t make coffee when you’re tent camping, then I’m not sure you need to be at BRC.

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  • Phoenix says:

    I’m here to plug HIVE, Burning Man’s FABULOUS online facilitation for discussion and communication. It would be SUPER to see this comment stream there, where there can be active participation AND ideas thrown around in a space with other Burners who are brilliant at instigating change and creating new projects. We’re already accomplishing a LOT both within the Burn and around the rest of the planet. Come check us out!! https://hive.burningman.org/feed

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  • Mark Atwood says:

    Just use a dutch auction for the tickets, with a holdback lottery for 10000 of the tickets at the low income price. No more lotteries, and no more “get in line to get in line to get in line” on a buggy realtime ticket queue.

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  • Emese Dombovari says:

    They are getting rid of the coffee because of covid, plain and simple. That coffee saved my life at my first burn it was the most amazing thing I ever tasted.

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  • ElderEffer says:

    Everyone thinks differently about all of this. Personally I’m excited for the streets to be back. More front porches again. Missed that these last two years. Hoping placement tries to help a bunch of camps stay in similar spots so I can find old friends. I only see some of these people every year when I’m out with everyone building our beautiful city. I’m going to go put another chuck e. cheese token in my wish dish and hope we get lucky and this all happens this year!!

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  • Patticakes says:

    Yayyy that plug-n-play is going away!
    Devastated that the Coffee Shop may become a mirage in the hazy heat. It’s very well run and provides good utility for the community; both in front of, and behind, the counter. I LOVE volunteering there and providing a useful service to other volunteers and myself; it’s a great fit for me.
    Seeking out questionable-quality coffee in sketchy sanitary conditions in ’22 would be further insult. Have we not suffered more-than-enough loss and detriment to community? Let us re-build; not tear apart.

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    • Java says:

      Sketchy sanitary conditions, really? I mean, that goes for every single food camp or bar out there. There are so many places that you can volunteer without having to deal with the–let’s be honest–commodification of beverages.

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  • Crystal M Campisi says:

    What about ICE?? Folks in tents can’t live a week without ICE!! And no other camps sell that!!

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  • Rio says:

    Sorry to see coffee go. Had wonderful volunteer experiences there. My wife’s goal after 8 burns was to become a barista. She made it!

    On the other hand think of all the waste we will eliminate by not pissing so much! Piss clear for the win.

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  • Jason Roth says:

    Please, for the love of BRC, refine the ticket process. The best way to get rid of scammers, scalpers and ensure that everyone who wants a ticket, gets one, would be to 1) go 100% electronic ticketing; 2) keep STEP open through the burn ensuring only face value transactions – void all others; 3) if burners really want a physical “ticket”…they can give ‘em out at Gate.

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  • coldgold says:

    it’s wasn’t about the coffee it was all about the CHAI! will def miss defining moment of my day reading the paper sipping on some cold, creamy chai.

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  • Dory says:

    Wow didn’t realize how much waste the coffee produces. Not necessary.

    But what about the ice? That’s necessary for a lot of camps and tent campers.

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  • half deaf says:

    Copied from Caveat’s recet post . . . . . .
    This is one of the reasons why Larry Harvey once said that his fear for Burning Man is that it would turn into “something that is received, rather than something that is discovered.”

    Plug and play patrons (the receivers) truely missed out on the experience. I always say if they came out and participated in the building, if they busted ass and sweat their ass off in the mid day sun, if they shit in the commons porta potty’s, if they suffered some ordeal and discomfort, if they experienced stress and chaos, then their burn experience would have been far more meaningful, far more profound, and more fun.

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  • Cheezit K. Riced (you can call me Cheezit) says:

    Are we going to miss the Sparkle Ponies and their handlers? Not a chance! Burn on in truth.

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  • Ramichi says:

    So, so excited by the OSS update. A thoughtful and precise response to the growing cultural problem that the city was facing. I’m now more excited than ever to come back.

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  • Driver says:

    Are you going to sell those espresso machines with all the great stickers on them? I’m up for getting one.

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  • Jim "Doc Pyro" Jacoby says:

    For those of us who paid for having a single trailer delivered in 2020, which has been rolled over to now, does this mean we can’t get our unit? The people that we have already paid are unable to refund our money as they used it to keep afloat during the pandemic. Can an exception for a situation like this be made? I’m not very anxious to lose out on nearly $3000.

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  • Randal huizenga says:

    I am a disabled veteran in his late 60s and the only way for me to attend burning man was might be able to have the owner of the empire store pre-place a decrepit camper for me at a group site which shared electric, water/grey water services. Was able to ship my supplies and tricycle back-and-forth from Chicago using another combined service. In this way I was able to reuse the same camper and equipment over and over that’s reducing waste and I was able to fly to Nevada and use he. Burner Bus, thus avoiding buying and burning hundreds and hundreds of gallons of gasoline.

    So now the only way for me to return To Burningman would be to rent an RV from Chicago for approximately $1800 a week for three weeks, and then spend a week each way driving 6500 miles and back at $1. 50 per mile and burning and hundreds of gallons of gasoline to do so.

    How could this possibly make any sense from the viewpoint of either commodification, or waste, or carbon footprint?

    Why do you want to ban older and disabled people from Burningman?

    Report comment

    • Ready! says:

      Hey, neighbor – just have a camp mate drive it in for you. It isn’t a problem for fellow ticketed burners to drive in an RV. And if you share the ride, we’re reducing vehicles, too. Might be a good time to hook up with the regionals in your area so you can find out who else is doing what as far as coming in. You’ll make it to the burn again!

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    • Leslie Moyer says:

      We understand that there are Burners with mobility concerns that rely on delivered housing. Our intent is to work with folks to better understand needs, and to create a process that can accommodate them while staying within the cultural bounds that we are trying to reestablish. Please stay tuned for more information in the new year.

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    • Trex says:

      >Why do you want to ban older and disabled people from Burningman?
      Because you’re old and disabled and that reminds the youth that their time is limited and their health is fragile, and that’s a bummer.

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    • Laurie Loving says:

      Perhaps you could make an exception for the delivered RV’s for people with a Disabled Placard?

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  • That Guy says:

    FOMO sale BEFORE the Direct Group sale? Feel sorry for the burners that are a part of camps that can’t get enough tickets for the whole camp. FOMO, being ridiculously over priced as is, was still one more avenue for camps to get tickets for everyone in the camp. Too much of a roll of the dice with the Main Sale for any reasonable prayer to get tickets.

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  • Thor Young says:

    I’ll be sad to see camps like Froze Oasis go away. The pay for and support and entire orchestra of musicians con=mint to and staying on playa to provide frozen drinks and full orchestral music performances alo week all over the playa. It is magic. But alas. I fear they can’t do it without OSS help.

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  • Jennifer Bruckler says:

    Any chance all ticket prices can be published sooner than later? This way people can get a head start on budgeting for their ticket and not be shocked right when its time to buy.

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  • Captn Wade says:

    We’d also like to know if BLM is gonna issue BMORG the permit.
    I spoke with two rangers out in Nevada that said that BLM was going to make proof of vaccination a requirement for BMORG to get a permit and closure order. If not, they were gonna deny the permit on the basis of Public Health and Safety. No one from the Borg has spoken a word about whether or not they are able to get permitted, nor how they plan to protect 2022 from becoming a Superspreader event.

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  • Silver Boombox thief says:

    Heart heart heart

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  • Great Grey says:

    Hmm…building on the sustainability theme…I wonder if Airport operations are under consideration for curtailment to JUST essential services and not a bunch of private planes bringing in plug and play folk? I have no data on the overall carbon footprint, but since coffee got the boot… a lot of other things should be reviewed also.
    Cheers..have a happy holidays!

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  • I understand the coffee sales change . I could get coffee at our came but I would go to center camp for it because it was an excuse to stand in line and meet all these wierd people that are so informative of the BM experience.

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  • Karen says:

    How can we think about Burning Man when the Omicron virus is spreading exponentially? This will be the Winter of Death and we’re more concerned about party planning?

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  • joseph stewart says:

    Though it may matter to a small portion of the community, here are some things that could be addressed.
    What will be population? 70k? 80K? ??
    Any changes to burner express?
    Any changes to burner express plus?
    Who is handling ticket sales – internal or external Ticketmaster ?
    What will be ticket distribution ? how many FOMO? DSG? General?

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  • Whammy Bar says:

    Really glad to hear of the changes. Honestly, I’ve never understood the sale of coffee at Center Camp – just never made sense and glad it’s gone. It went against everything else.
    Getting rid of delivered RVs and services is also very, very excellent.
    Definitely headed the right direction.
    Thanks so much

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  • Phil Manning says:

    You mentioned how there had to be some trenching to get rid of the 25,000 gallons of gray water. Could this possibly be done for the rest of us? If you’re not going to have coffee. Could We possibly have a more responsible way of getting rid of our gray water ? Instead of just dumping it out on the way out of BRC? I’m all for self reliance. Just asking.

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  • Funny Bunny says:

    Can’t we just the cafe to Starbucks? =) =) =)

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  • Ziggi says:

    Re: “No more pathways for pre-paid RV or trailer deliveries to participants within BRC.” What about legit providers like Playa Slumlords? As an, ahem, older Burner, I’ve aged out of a tent. Due to glaucoma, I can no longer safely drive. Like others in a similar situation, or those from far-flung locations, my plan was to fly into Reno, hop the Burner Bus and share the cost of renting a towed-in trailer (the older and funkier the better) from a Burner-operated vendor. I feel like the org’s plan is an attempt to wipe out a symptom of Plug-and-Play culture without addressing the root cause of the disease. IMHO, if, during placement, you can vet camps for intangible qualities like “uniqueness,” it shouldn’t be that difficult to figure out if they’re a money-grubbing for-profit enterprise.

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  • 0101 says:

    Are you trying to tell me that there is no one to blame? That’s exactly what they want us to believe

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  • Silvergirl says:

    Center camp coffee would produce so much less waste with:
    1) bring your own damn cup (duh). That’s 30k paper cups someone else will buy and throw out
    2) just serve it black and hot or cold brew (no need for ice, no need for tetrapack milk waste
    3) acknowleging that coffee draws people to center camp. We all aren’t into acroyoga exhibitions.
    Waking dreams not woke without coffee.

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  • Ghostmost says:

    THANK YOU!! Crazy how much waste it generated! Will part 2 outline the testing/whether there will be a vaccination requirement?

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  • Dragon says:

    “In an effort to course-correct, we are no longer allowing delivered housing units to be part of the OSS program.”

    Although the spirit of this policy is appreciated, I don’t expect to see it preventing the plug ‘n’ play and convenience camps from showing up. Say the average PNP camp has been bringing in 20-30 RVs, give or take, thru the OSS program. What is going to prevent them from bringing in the same 20-30 RVs without OSS support? All ya gotta do is find 20-30 PNP campers or camp slaves to drive them in through the Gate. Armed with a valid ticket, how could they be turned away? The policy might make it a bit more difficult for a PNP camp, but entrepreneurs thrive on challenges. How are groups of friends all driving in with RVs going to be stopped from forming a camp? I predict about the same number of RV walled-off camps as there have ever been. I’m seeing a distinction without a difference.

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  • Merlin says:

    I think i am the only guy from Seattle who does not drink coffee. Never liked it. Always go to center camp every burn. Center camp is not about coffee. Honestly the coffee shop made center camp feel very out of place i am excited to see it without the coffee

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  • Robert X. Planet says:

    Oh, joy! I’ll continue to do what I’ve been doing for fifteen years: Make my own hot, delicious, fresh brewed, aromatic Folger’s coffee in my own RV and enjoy it while it’s still drinkable. Mmm! That is, instead of waiting in line for half an hour, only to fork over $3 to get the skin scalded off my mouth by a volcanic cup of the vilest-tasting, foul-looking sewer sludge that no amount of liquid sweetener or powdered mystery “creamer” could save. Why did you wait so long to get rid of it?

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